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10-K
GRAHAM HOLDINGS CO filed this Form 10-K on 02/23/2018
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No assurance can be given that KU programs currently participating in Title IV programs will maintain their Title IV eligibility, accreditation and state authorization in the future or that the ED might not successfully assert that one or more of such programs have previously failed to comply with Title IV requirements. The loss of Title IV eligibility by KU would have a material adverse effect on Kaplan’s operating results.
If the transfer of KU is consummated, Kaplan would no longer own or operate KU and would no longer participate in the Title IV programs as an institution. However, Kaplan would face the risks discussed above in connection with providing services to the new university.
Program Reviews, Audits, Investigations and Other Reviews of KHE Schools Could Result in Findings of Failure to Comply With Statutory and Regulatory Requirements
KU is subject to program reviews, audits, investigations and other compliance reviews conducted by various regulatory agencies and auditors, including, among others, the ED, the ED’s Office of the Inspector General, accrediting bodies and state and various other federal agencies, as well as annual audits by an independent certified public accountant of the OPEID unit’s compliance with Title IV statutory and regulatory requirements. These compliance reviews can result in findings of non-compliance with statutory and regulatory requirements that can, in turn, result in proceedings to impose fines, liabilities, civil or criminal penalties or other sanctions against the school, including loss or limitation of its eligibility to participate in Title IV programs or in other federal or state financial assistance programs. Certain former KHE schools are the subject of ongoing compliance reviews and lawsuits related to their compliance with statutory and regulatory requirements and may be subject to future compliance reviews or lawsuits. Although substantially all of the assets of KHE on-ground schools were sold on September 3, 2015, Kaplan retained liability for the pre-sale conduct of those schools, and there are outstanding program reviews at two of these former schools.
KHE schools have been, and may in the future be, subject to complaints and lawsuits by present or former students or employees or other people related to compliance with statutory, common law and regulatory requirements that, if successful, could result in monetary liabilities or fines or other sanctions.
Reductions in the Amount of Funds Available to Students, Including Under Title IV Programs, in KU, Changes in the Terms on Which Such Funds Are Made Available or Loss or Limitation of Eligibility to Receive Such Funds Could Have a Material Adverse Effect on Kaplan’s Business and Operations
During the Company’s 2017 fiscal year, funds provided under the student financial aid programs created under Title IV accounted for approximately $374 million of KHE revenues, and 25% of Kaplan Inc. revenues. Any legislative, regulatory or other development that has the effect of materially reducing the amount of Title IV financial assistance or other funds available to the students of those schools would have a material adverse effect on Kaplan’s business and operations. In addition, any development that has the effect of making the terms on which Title IV financial assistance or other funds are available to students of those schools materially less attractive could have a material adverse effect on Kaplan’s business and operations.
If the transfer of KU is consummated, revenues from Kaplan’s service agreement with the new university could be adversely impacted to the extent legislative, regulatory or other developments have the effect of materially reducing tuition revenues by reducing the amount of Title IV financial assistance or other funds available to the students of the new university.
ED Rules Regarding Borrower Defense to Repayment Could Have a Material Adverse Effect on Kaplan’s Business and Operations
On November 1, 2016, the ED issued final rules that were scheduled to go into effect on July 1, 2017, that expand the bases on which borrowers may obtain ED discharge of their federal financial aid loans and establish a process for the ED to commence a separate proceeding against the institution to recover the discharged amounts. In June 2017, the ED announced a delay until further notice in the effective date of the majority of these regulations. The ED also announced its intent to convene a negotiated rulemaking committee to develop proposed regulations to revise the regulations on borrower defenses to repayment of Federal student loans and other matters published on November 1, 2016. On October 24, 2017, the ED published an interim final rule that delayed until at least July 1, 2018, the effective date of the majority of these regulations. On the same date, the ED also published a notice of proposed rulemaking that proposed to further delay, until July 1, 2019, the effective date of the majority of the regulations to ensure that there is adequate time to conduct negotiated rulemaking and, as necessary, develop revised regulations. Comments on the proposal were due by November 24, 2017. The ED convened the first meeting of the negotiated rulemaking committee in November 2017 and convened additional meetings in early 2018. The ED intends to issue proposed regulations for public comment during the first half of 2018, but the ED has not established a final schedule. Any regulations published in final form by November 1, 2018, typically would take effect on July 1, 2019, but there is no assurance as to the timing or content of any such regulations. On February 14, 2018, the ED issued a final regulation delaying the effective date of most of the provisions with respect to borrower defense until November 1, 2019. The ED has indicated that, in the meantime, it will continue to accept claims with respect to borrower defense and process them under pre-2016 policies and practices.

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